Scarlet Starts Slowly Coming Together Again

This week I only managed a little bike time, as I’m in the middle of some woodworking projects and still needed to fit in some quality time with family!

Having reattached the carburetor last week, I needed to reinstall the airbox and battery holder.

The airbox went in first of course, as it needed to be maneuvered back into place.

Once the airbox was back where it belonged, I was able to line up the battery holder and electronics.

I reattached the CDI before putting the bolts in.

The battery was put back on charge for now, as I haven’t started the bike again yet!

I’ll try to fit in a bit more bike time over the next week and see if the leaking carburetor is fixed at last and if she starts any easier.If the leak;s fixed, I’ll see if I can finally find that electrical fault and get all the lights and horn working again!

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The End Of My Holidays, Sylvie’s First Inspection Anniversary, And A Not-So-Smart Charger

This week I gave Sylvie some attention, as I’ll have finished my holidays by the time this post is published. It will also mark the first anniversary of my post about her successful rego inspection!

As expected, the battery had no charge after not riding for nearly a month!

This of course meant that the seat came off so I could access the onboard toolkit and take off the side panel to attach the charger.

I connected my newer “smart” charger.

It turned out that the charger wasn’t smart enough to recognise a flat motorcycle battery, as the fancy electronics seemed a bit confused by the apparently totally flat battery.

So I hooked up the trusty old trickle charger.

 

The lights indicated that it was charging, so I left it on for about 8 hours.

It seems to have had no problem charging the battery, as when I turned on the ignition again I found everything to be working as well as ever. I started the bike and let it warm up for a while.

Despite the temperature being 39-40°C (102-104°F, for any readers not yet using metric measurements), I put on my gear and went for a ride!

I’m happy to report that apart from needing fuel, no other issues came up.

That’s all for now – I’ll see what I can work on for next week’s update!

A New Charger, Scarlet Still Floods And Testing A Scratch Repair Kit On Erica’s Spare Tank

I picked a couple of new things from Aldi this week to keep me busy while I wait for a replacement chain and sprocket set for Sylvie.

While the faithful old trickle charger has served me well over the last few years, the fact that it’s switched to trickle mode hasn’t always been an accurate indicator of a battery that’s ready for use. With Scarlet’s battery on it over the last week, I decided to switch the charger over to Erica to help with the electrical troubleshooting.

Here’s a better view of the new charger.

Some assembly was required,

No tools were needed to put it together, so assembly only took about a minute.

The clamps seemed fairly sturdy and the colour-coded connector and nuts were a nice touch.

After following the instructions to make sure the new charger was in motorcycle mode and checking Scarlet’s battery, the new charger indicated that Scarlet’s battery was in fact charged.

In addition to the bright green LED, the outer box of the the battery symbol flashes to indicate a fully charged battery.

I decided to try the new charger on Erica, as the trickle charger was on slow charge mode. It shows 12.2 Volts but the electronics were clever enough in motorcycle mode to show that this battery still needed more charging.

The clamps were a little trickier to connect to a motorcycle battery still installed on a bike but held quite securely once positioned correctly.

After a few minutes, the voltage had increased slightly. I’ll see how this battery goes over the next week or so.

I turned on Scarlet’s ignition but no lights were working, so I started her up and found she started easily but stalled without choke and was dumping fuel fairly quickly. In order to confirm the source of the fuel, I moved Scarlet out onto some scrap cardboard on the lawn.

Sure enough, after running the motor for a few minutes a puddle started to form.

You can see exactly how fast it was coming out in the video below.

There was quite the puddle of fuel after only a short run.

After investigation, I confirmed the fuel was coming from the fuel hose at the bottom of the carburetor. Time for a rebuild or to swap out the one on Erica, it seems…

I also noticed the spring that connects the brake pedal to the brake light switch had come off, so I decided to fix that. The first thing I noticed was that the switch was sitting way too high up.

I lowered the switch as far as it would go, then reconnected the spring.

Then I adjusted the switch height and tested it by pushing down the brake pedal with my hand and checking the switch was pulled down as expected.

I took the opportunity to get a nice photo of Scarlet from the right before putting her away.

I moved the cardboard into the shed before putting Scarlet back, so I can hopefully catch any further spills before they hit the floor.

I decided to test the scratch removal kit on Ericas spare tank (the black one). I wasn’t expecting miracles from it, as it”s only really intended for minor scratch removal.

Here’s how the tank looked before using the scratch remover.

And here’s how it looked after.

To be honest, it just looks a bit more polished! I haven’t given up on it completely though, I’ll see how it goes on the minor scratches on Sylvie’s tank at some stage.

Next entry will be fitting Sylvie’s new chain and sprockets.

Providing there are no problems with Erica’s carburetor, I’ll probably do another  CB250RS carburetor swap and/or rebuild shortly after that before returning to electrical fault-finding.