Emergency Refueling And Trying Plastic Welding

This week, I ran out of fuel just before payday so I tipped some fuel from Rosie’s tank into a fuel can to refuel Sylvie. I also tried out my plastic welding kit for the first time.

I captured all the action on video – here’s the vlog:

The refueling comprised getting fuel out of Rosie’s tank into a fuel can, which proved harder than expected.

I eventually just poured the fuel out of the top of the tank.

 

I refueled Sylvie from the fuel can and promptly hit reserver again on the next day’s commute.

I filled up the fuel can again the next time I took my car out so I could get to work again without needing to completely fill the tank before the Christmas/New Year break.

I decided to try out my plastic welding kit on one of Erica’s side panels, as I hadn’t used it yet. It turned out pretty well for a first attempt.

I also found out that the clutch switch only stopped working again during the heavy rain we had last week and worked fine again once it had dried out, so replacing it is no longer quite as urgent.

That’s all for this week’s update – I’ll see what I can fit in over the next week. In the meantime, Merry Christmas to those who celebrate it, and Happy New Year to all!

 

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More Work On Erica’s Electrics But She Still Won’t Start

This week, I had some time to work on Erica again.

The first thing I did was take another look at the battery I’d taken from Erica and tried to rejuvenate. The electrolyte was looking quite low in some cells again, so the battery may not be salvageable. I topped up the cells with demineralised water again just in case.

The smart charger at least showed a usable voltage after topping up this time, which seemed like a good sign.

The battery cage has seen better days, as there is a surface coat of rust on it. I’m not too worried about that at this point, that will be a cosmetic issue to fix later.

I decided to clean the battery terminals before refitting the battery.

 

The battery once again seemed to have enough charge, so I replaced in its original location.

 

I unlocked the fuel filler cap retainer and added a few litres of fuel to the tank.

I put the seat back on top and tried kickstarting the bike a few times.

I wasn’t able to get ther to fire up and there was still no activity on the lights, so I reconnected the charger and tried the key in the Park position. To my surprise, the tail light came on! There’s clearly a bit more work than I thought to be done with the electrical system.

Finally, I slid the rubber for the kickstart lever back on, as  I;d left it after never fully removing it some time ago.

I’ll have to go over the wiring diagrams a few more times and order some replacement terminals before I tackle re-soldering the missing wiring inside the headlight – while I’m at it I’ll give the switches and fuses a thorough check as well.

A New Tank Pad For Sylvie

This week, I set about removing the old tank pad from Sylvie to replace it.

The old tank pad had become quite brittle and was hard to remove, so I used the hard plastic blade of an old fan as a scraper.

 

I also used some heavy duty textured wipes to clean off the glue and remainder of the sticker.under the brittle clear layer.

 

It was slow going but I finally managed to clean off all traces of the old tank pad off.

   

I gave the tank a final wipe over and let it dry

 

Finally, I applied the new tank pad.

     

While the new tank pad looks very similar to the one it replaced, I’m hoping it’d better quality and that it lasts a little longer than the old one did!

That’s all for this week. Next week, I hope to return to working on either Rosie or Scarlet.

Scarlet’s New Fuel Tap And Erica Gets Temporary Headlight Mounts

Scarlet’s old fuel tap had been leaking, so I wasn’t able to keep fuel in the tank. The replacement arrived last week, so this week I decided to fit it.

First I made sure the old tap was completely turned off and disconnected the fuel line from the carburetor.

I decided to run the hose directly into the nozzle from a fuel can to drain it.

The tank turned out to be basically empty anyway, so I removed it and put it on its side to remove the old tap.

The tap came off easily but left its inserts behind. I was able to coax them out with some needle-nose pliers.

 

The replacement tap. It’s not a genuine part but it’ll do for now.

New tap installed, Shiny!

The hose was a bit loose on the new tap, so I wrapped the outlet with teflon plumbers’ tape until I can get some thinner fuel line and popped the tank back on.

The mid fairings went on again next.

 

And finally the seat. Sylvie’s in the background and Erica’s in the foreground.

Speaking of Erica, the loose headlight had been bothering me.

I found some 13mm M6 bolts and matching washers in an assortment I picked up a while ago. They have 13mm hex heads and nuts but will do for now.

That’s all for this week. More on Erica’s headlight mounts once I get to looking at the wiring looms!

 

Scarlet Sprung A Leak, But Still Starts!

I had been smelling petrol fumes while in the bike shed lately – this week I found out why.

The fuel tap was leaking! Either I bumped it while putting the tank back on, the washer has perished or the fuel tap has simply seen better days – it is over thirty years old, after all!

  

The nut was a bit loose, so I tightened the it by hand and reattached the fuel line between the fuel tap and the carburetor.

While I was working in the shed, my stepdaughter came out to see what I was doing as dinner was nearly ready. She wanted to climb on Erica, so I snapped a shot of the next generation of motorcyclist.

Meanwhile, I’d taken Scarlet out of the shed to replace the battery before trying to kick-start her.

I’m pleased to report that she started with very little effort, so the carburetor rebuild seems to have worked!

Finally, my stepdaughter decided to try the back of Erica’s seat. She found it very comfy!

I’ll try to get some video of Scarlet running in time for next week’s update!

Scarlet Continues Slowly Coming Together

This week, I got a parcel from Thailand!

The packaging was quite plain.

 

Inside were 2 sets of (apparently) New Old Stock tank rubbers of the model that superseded the ones one Scarlet.

So of course I tried replacing the old ones before refitting the tank and seat.

The left ones are new, the right ones are the originals.

The new mounts in place.

I reconnected the wiring.

I tried refitting the tank and found it just wouldn’t fit! On closer inspection it turned out that the new mounts were substantially thicker than the originals.

 .

I replaced the original monts and the tank as on again in a flash!

The mounting bolt seems to have disappeared somewhere in the shed, so I just put the seat back on over the top.

As it was quite late at  night by this stage, I took a couple more photos of Scarlet and finished up for the night.

 

Forward Planning And Removing Sylvie’s Carburetor

Last week, I decided to continue my forward planning and finally rewrite the lists for the Honda projects.

I started by erasing the lists altogether.

I then consulted the transcribed lists ans set about recreating them

I added a battery to the list for Erica, as the one I’m using in her is not holding its charge well and I suspect it’s faulty.

I then made a list of parts that the bikes would benefit from that will be needed for tasks in the main lists and hung it on the back of one of the shed doors, so that I see it when I’m leaving the shed.

I found a list of shed tasks I had started some time ago that needed updating.

Since I haven’t managed any of the stuff on the list yet, I added to it and put it inside the the other shed door so I’ll see it when I’m leaving the shed too.

The new lists worked, as I ordered a carb kit for Sylvie. Since it’ll be arriving this week, I decided to remove the carburetor ahead of time and have it ready to rebuild.

Off came the seat and side panels.

I decided to put all the bolts into a magnetic parts tray that had all other bolts and parts removed first.

After removing the tank, I put the tank and side panels aside so they wouldn’t get dropped.

Next up was the battery.

With the battery out, I stacked it on top of my growing collection of dead or dying batteries – It might be time to drop them off for recycling soon!

I disconnected all the electrical connections ready to take out the battery frame and attached electrics.

I can never seem to remember which of the 3 wires go on the flasher can, so I  took a photo before disconnecting it this time.

I took out the battery frame with the electrical components still bolted on and put it with the other parts

I found the overflow hose for the battery had come off when I removed the battery, so I put it back on the overflow vent of the battery.

 

Next I removed the air intake and manoeuvred the airbox out of the frame. it went with the other parts.

I disconnected the choke and loosened the retaining nuts for the  throttle cables.

I moved the cables out of their mounting points

the disconnected the throttle cables and removed the carb.

 

Finally, I updated the parts list.

Next entry will most likely be either the carb rebuild or more teardown of the spare motor