Scarlet’s New Fuel Tap And Erica Gets Temporary Headlight Mounts

Scarlet’s old fuel tap had been leaking, so I wasn’t able to keep fuel in the tank. The replacement arrived last week, so this week I decided to fit it.

First I made sure the old tap was completely turned off and disconnected the fuel line from the carburetor.

I decided to run the hose directly into the nozzle from a fuel can to drain it.

The tank turned out to be basically empty anyway, so I removed it and put it on its side to remove the old tap.

The tap came off easily but left its inserts behind. I was able to coax them out with some needle-nose pliers.

 

The repalcement tap. It’s not a genuine part but it’ll do for now.

New tap installed, Shiny!

The hose was a bit loose on the new tap, so I wrapped the outlet with teflon plumbers’ tape until I can get some thinner fuel line and popped the tank back on.

The mid fairings went on again next.

And finally the seat. Sylvie’s in the background and Erica’s in the foreground.

Speaking of Erica, the loose headlight had been bothering me.

I found some 13mm M6 bolts and matching washers in an assortment I picked up a while ago. They have 13mm hex heads and nuts but will do for now.

That’s all for this week. More on Erica’s headlight mounts once I get to looking at the wiring looms!

 

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Scarlet Sprung A Leak, But Still Starts!

I had been smelling petrol fumes while in the bike shed lately – this week I found out why.

The fuel tap was leaking! Either I bumped it while putting the tank back on, the washer has perished or the fuel tap has simply seen better days – it is over thirty years old, after all!

  

The nut was a bit loose, so I tightened the it by hand and reattached the fuel line between the fuel tap and the carburetor.

While I was working in the shed, my stepdaughter came out to see what I was doing as dinner was nearly ready. She wanted to climb on Erica, so I snapped a shot of the next generation of motorcyclist.

Meanwhile, I’d taken Scarlet out of the shed to replace the battery before trying to kick-start her.

I’m pleased to report that she started with very little effort, so the carburetor rebuild seems to have worked!

Finally, my stepdaughter decided to try the back of Erica’s seat. She found it very comfy!

I’ll try to get some video of Scarlet running in time for next week’s update!

Scarlet Continues Slowly Coming Together

This week, I got a parcel from Thailand!

The packaging was quite plain.

 

Inside were 2 sets of (apparently) New Old Stock tank rubbers of the model that superseded the ones one Scarlet.

So of course I tried replacing the old ones before refitting the tank and seat.

The left ones are new, the right ones are the originals.

The new mounts in place.

I reconnected the wiring.

I tried refitting the tank and found it just wouldn’t fit! On closer inspection it turned out that the new mounts were substantially thicker than the originals.

 .

I replaced the original monts and the tank as on again in a flash!

The mounting bolt seems to have disappeared somewhere in the shed, so I just put the seat back on over the top.

As it was quite late at  night by this stage, I took a couple more photos of Scarlet and finished up for the night.

 

Forward Planning And Removing Sylvie’s Carburetor

Last week, I decided to continue my forward planning and finally rewrite the lists for the Honda projects.

I started by erasing the lists altogether.

I then consulted the transcribed lists ans set about recreating them

I added a battery to the list for Erica, as the one I’m using in her is not holding its charge well and I suspect it’s faulty.

I then made a list of parts that the bikes would benefit from that will be needed for tasks in the main lists and hung it on the back of one of the shed doors, so that I see it when I’m leaving the shed.

I found a list of shed tasks I had started some time ago that needed updating.

Since I haven’t managed any of the stuff on the list yet, I added to it and put it inside the the other shed door so I’ll see it when I’m leaving the shed too.

The new lists worked, as I ordered a carb kit for Sylvie. Since it’ll be arriving this week, I decided to remove the carburetor ahead of time and have it ready to rebuild.

Off came the seat and side panels.

I decided to put all the bolts into a magnetic parts tray that had all other bolts and parts removed first.

After removing the tank, I put the tank and side panels aside so they wouldn’t get dropped.

Next up was the battery.

With the battery out, I stacked it on top of my growing collection of dead or dying batteries – It might be time to drop them off for recycling soon!

I disconnected all the electrical connections ready to take out the battery frame and attached electrics.

I can never seem to remember which of the 3 wires go on the flasher can, so I  took a photo before disconnecting it this time.

I took out the battery frame with the electrical components still bolted on and put it with the other parts

I found the overflow hose for the battery had come off when I removed the battery, so I put it back on the overflow vent of the battery.

 

Next I removed the air intake and manoeuvred the airbox out of the frame. it went with the other parts.

I disconnected the choke and loosened the retaining nuts for the  throttle cables.

I moved the cables out of their mounting points

the disconnected the throttle cables and removed the carb.

 

Finally, I updated the parts list.

Next entry will most likely be either the carb rebuild or more teardown of the spare motor

 

Bonus Post – A Fuel Tap And Tank Swap For Erica

After setting up the mats, I took a couple of days break and decided I’d wheel Erica out into the sun to test the threshold ramp. It certainly made getting the bike out easier!

I decided to take a couple of full-view progress shots.

After trying unsuccessfully to kick-start Erica, I thought the leaking fuel tap in reserve position might be related, so I set about draining the black tank.

While draining the tank, I removed the seat in preparation for swapping the tank over.

I put the glovebox cover back on the rear cowl so I knew where it was and it wouldn’t get stepped on.

The fuel tank turned out to have about 3 litres of fuel in it.

I put the side panel on to p of the seat, as I didn’t want to risk stepping on it either!

THis side panel still has all 3 mounting pins intact and I’d like to keep them that way if possible.

I unlocked the tank cover and removed the cap to help get the last of the fuel out.

While I was at it, I removed the fuel tank locking strap, as its lock matches the rest on Erica.

The tank was placed over a suitable receptacleand turn upside-down to get the old fuel tap off.

I put the fuel line aside on top of the side panel for safe keeping.

I then examined the old fuel tap. The filter, o-ring and reserve pipe seem to be in reasonable condition so could be re-used.

THe tank was sloshed around until all the fuel that was coming out was out.

Tee frame was looking a bit bare, especially with only one tank mounting rubber.

I figured I may as well put the blue tank on Erica to get used to it. Although it has no visible dents, it’s sorely in need of repainting! Compared with the fuel cap from the black tank, this one has also lost a lot of its paint…

I unlocked the fuel cap cover and removed the fuel cap. The interior of the tank seemed to be in pretty good shape.

I removed the locking strap in preparation for fitting the original one again.

I compared the bases of the fuel caps from both tanks. The black one seems to be in better shape.

 

After a short break to photograph the blackboard lists for the Hondas (more on that in the last post) I dug out the aftermarket fuel tap. While there are a few differences from the leaking genuine one, it still has the right overall style and will do the job at least until the bike is running again!

I fitted the lid and locking cap from the black tank to keep the locks matching.

The thread for the tap was nice and clean already.

On went the aftermarket tap.

The fuel line was replaced next.

I pulled out the box of assorted CB250RS spares.

I found the grommets for the tank mounting pins.

I re-fitted the grommets to both sides

Popped the tank on.

I put the worn fuel cap on the black tank to go with the spares.

I put a small piece of rag inside the replacement fuel tank to make sure the fuel going in from the old tank was as clean as possible.

After pouring in the fuel from the drain pan, I found very little in the way of visible contaminants.

I replaced the rag and repeated the process for the fuel in the fuel can. This fuel had almost no visible contaminants.

I removed the mounting grommets from the black tank.

I sprayed them with Inox prior to removal.

To make sure they last as long as possible, I applied rubber grease to restore some of their elasticity

Once wiped off, I put them aside in the ziplock back I’d originally stored the grommets  from the blue tank in.

I fitted the leftover tank strap on the the black tank and put the tank away with the other larger spare CB250RS parts.

I noticed some discolouration of the front mudguard and rubbed my hand over it without thinking. Looking down, I saw shrivelled-up blue paint flecks on the ground and realised I’d just rubbed off some paint that brake fluid had dripped onto from the leaking master brake cylinder. I’ll have to rebuild or replace that master brake cylinder bore repainting!

 

After all that, I didn’t manage to get Erica to start after all. I’ll have to have a look into the electrical issues and maybe try another battery.

In the next post, I finally make some progress on the seized spare CB250RS motor at long last!

A New Charger, Scarlet Still Floods And Testing A Scratch Repair Kit On Erica’s Spare Tank

I picked a couple of new things from Aldi this week to keep me busy while I wait for a replacement chain and sprocket set for Sylvie.

While the faithful old trickle charger has served me well over the last few years, the fact that it’s switched to trickle mode hasn’t always been an accurate indicator of a battery that’s ready for use. With Scarlet’s battery on it over the last week, I decided to switch the charger over to Erica to help with the electrical troubleshooting.

Here’s a better view of the new charger.

Some assembly was required,

No tools were needed to put it together, so assembly only took about a minute.

The clamps seemed fairly sturdy and the colour-coded connector and nuts were a nice touch.

After following the instructions to make sure the new charger was in motorcycle mode and checking Scarlet’s battery, the new charger indicated that Scarlet’s battery was in fact charged.

In addition to the bright green LED, the outer box of the the battery symbol flashes to indicate a fully charged battery.

I decided to try the new charger on Erica, as the trickle charger was on slow charge mode. It shows 12.2 Volts but the electronics were clever enough in motorcycle mode to show that this battery still needed more charging.

The clamps were a little trickier to connect to a motorcycle battery still installed on a bike but held quite securely once positioned correctly.

After a few minutes, the voltage had increased slightly. I’ll see how this battery goes over the next week or so.

I turned on Scarlet’s ignition but no lights were working, so I started her up and found she started easily but stalled without choke and was dumping fuel fairly quickly. In order to confirm the source of the fuel, I moved Scarlet out onto some scrap cardboard on the lawn.

Sure enough, after running the motor for a few minutes a puddle started to form.

You can see exactly how fast it was coming out in the video below.

There was quite the puddle of fuel after only a short run.

After investigation, I confirmed the fuel was coming from the fuel hose at the bottom of the carburetor. Time for a rebuild or to swap out the one on Erica, it seems…

I also noticed the spring that connects the brake pedal to the brake light switch had come off, so I decided to fix that. The first thing I noticed was that the switch was sitting way too high up.

I lowered the switch as far as it would go, then reconnected the spring.

Then I adjusted the switch height and tested it by pushing down the brake pedal with my hand and checking the switch was pulled down as expected.

I took the opportunity to get a nice photo of Scarlet from the right before putting her away.

I moved the cardboard into the shed before putting Scarlet back, so I can hopefully catch any further spills before they hit the floor.

I decided to test the scratch removal kit on Ericas spare tank (the black one). I wasn’t expecting miracles from it, as it”s only really intended for minor scratch removal.

Here’s how the tank looked before using the scratch remover.

And here’s how it looked after.

To be honest, it just looks a bit more polished! I haven’t given up on it completely though, I’ll see how it goes on the minor scratches on Sylvie’s tank at some stage.

Next entry will be fitting Sylvie’s new chain and sprockets.

Providing there are no problems with Erica’s carburetor, I’ll probably do another  CB250RS carburetor swap and/or rebuild shortly after that before returning to electrical fault-finding.

 

I Helped A Stuck Rider (And Had Another Shed Cleanup).

This evening I had to make a stop for fuel right after work, as I’d hit the reserve level on the way to work.

After getting most of the way home, I saw a rider stopped on the side of the road. I pulled over and asked if he was ok. He thanked me for stopping, and let me know he’d run out of fuel and his reserve wasn’t working for some reason.

He lived not far from my home and asked if I could give him a lift near his house so he could organise to come back for his bike. I agreed, and was just reorganising my luggage to make room  for a pillion passenger when he let me know his reserve was working again and he’d got the bike started.

He asked if I’d mind riding behind him to the nearest petrol station to make sure he got there without further issues. I agreed, of course!

He waved me on just before the last set of lights before the petrol station and yelled out one more “Thank you!” as I passed and turned off towards my suburb.

No photo or video unfortunately, as I stopped using the GoPro on my daily commutes a couple of months ago!

Earlier this week, I’d realised the shed was getting cluttered again, so it was time for a cleanup!

I started with the stray spanners, hex keys and and gloves on Erica’s seat.

The stray cardboard was next.

The spanners should have been here.

I put Erica’s battery on to charge, so I can start her again later and have another look at the electrical system. I needed somewhere to put the air tools and old brake lever, too.

The remnants of flat-pack shelves were getting in the way too.

I left a fair bit of clutter behind after soda-blasting and even had trimmer line I’d left on the floor.

All a bit of a shambles, really…

Not to mention the random cardboard with recently-replaced parts somewhere under it!

There was a bit of a gap on the shelf that needed filling, so the cowl I’d used as test piece for blasting went back there.

The new air hose and tyre gauge fit nicely over the pole on these shelves.

A few spanners went back in the right places on the peg board.

A layer of soda dust was wiped off Erica’s seat.

Sylvie’s old headlight was rescued from the cardboard.

The CBF250 headlight was boxed and the air tools were stacked under the blackboard. The spare dented CB50RS tank will be sand or soda blasted another day, so I decided to get it off the floor while I was at it.

Tucked away neatly on the shelf again.

 

The older ones were cleared from under the trickle charger and Scarlet’s seat cleared of soda dust.

Sylvie’s old side panels and bar ends were retrieved from under the cardboard.

I bagged and tagged the bar ends.

The side panels and bar ends found a home under the workbench, near boxes containing similar parts.

The old brake lever went in the box with the headlight under the chalkboard.

The air tools were stacked more neatly and the warped veneer panels that once were the back of a shelf were put under the boxes to flatten them again.

Stray cardboard was removed and the floor was finally visible again!

The sand blaster spec sheet and troubleshooting guide were put somewhere they’ll be found again.

Almost lost under here was the mounting pin that broke off one of Sylvie’s side panels.

I made room for the blasting gun on the peg board.

The mounting pin was left near the side panels so as not to go astray again.

The tub of blasting sand found a home on a shelf.

And some random parts were left on the clipboard for visibility. THe top one is either a fairing mount left behind from Nix or a random mounting washer from one a CB250RS headlight bracket or instrument cluster.

The tags from the replacement side panels went on top of the old ones to remind me to re-tag them.

All in all, the she is slightly more organised than it was when I started!