Sylvie Demands a Sleep-In, Her Bearings Arrive And I Suspect The Front Brake Pads

Just a short update this week, as I was celebrating my baby daughter’s first birthday over the weekend.

Last Monday Sylvie refused to start until I gave her a jumpstart from the car after not being ridden for a couple of days over the weekend. This wasn’t completely unexpected, as I’ve been using the heated grips a lot more now that the frosts have started and have a fairly short ride to and from work. I’m planning on fitting some wiring to allow a trickle charger to be connected in order to prevent this issue recurring in the dead of winter.

The replacement front wheel bearing kit for Sylvie arrived this week!

I was quite impressed with the kit.

While these looked like excellent aftermarket parts, I decided to take another look at the front wheel before fitting them as the noise seemed to be coming from the vicinity of the front brake caliper.

The pads seemed quite worn, so I decided to hold off on removing the front wheel until I have ordered some new brake pads and possibly a new brake disc. I’ll have to check the disc thickness just in case…

That’s all for this week. Next week I’ll most likely be making a weekend trip to Sydney to pick up some spare parts I’ve been offered for free if I can collect them!
Hopefully I’ll get some shed time in soon as well.

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Scarlet Sprung A Leak, But Still Starts!

I had been smelling petrol fumes while in the bike shed lately – this week I found out why.

The fuel tap was leaking! Either I bumped it while putting the tank back on, the washer has perished or the fuel tap has simply seen better days – it is over thirty years old, after all!

  

The nut was a bit loose, so I tightened the it by hand and reattached the fuel line between the fuel tap and the carburetor.

While I was working in the shed, my stepdaughter came out to see what I was doing as dinner was nearly ready. She wanted to climb on Erica, so I snapped a shot of the next generation of motorcyclist.

Meanwhile, I’d taken Scarlet out of the shed to replace the battery before trying to kick-start her.

I’m pleased to report that she started with very little effort, so the carburetor rebuild seems to have worked!

Finally, my stepdaughter decided to try the back of Erica’s seat. She found it very comfy!

I’ll try to get some video of Scarlet running in time for next week’s update!

Scarlet Starts Slowly Coming Together Again

This week I only managed a little bike time, as I’m in the middle of some woodworking projects and still needed to fit in some quality time with family!

Having reattached the carburetor last week, I needed to reinstall the airbox and battery holder.

The airbox went in first of course, as it needed to be maneuvered back into place.

Once the airbox was back where it belonged, I was able to line up the battery holder and electronics.

I reattached the CDI before putting the bolts in.

The battery was put back on charge for now, as I haven’t started the bike again yet!

I’ll try to fit in a bit more bike time over the next week and see if the leaking carburetor is fixed at last and if she starts any easier.If the leak;s fixed, I’ll see if I can finally find that electrical fault and get all the lights and horn working again!

An Anniversary, Scarlet’s Carb Is Refitted, A Battery Charged, And Lists Updated

The last week was quite a busy one, so I haven’t spent a lot of time one the bikes. Last  weekend also marked the 20th anniversary of my mother’s death on the Australia Day long weekend, so I kept myself busy attending to my house and family.

I did manage to refit Scarlet’s carburetor though! Working on a Honda CB250 RS over this particular weekend is very important to me, as mentioned a couple of times on this blog before...

I had misplaced the mounting bracket for the throttle cables last week – I found it during a shed clean-up thought, so I replaced it before mounting the carvuretor

As the weather has been quite warm in the Australian summer, I was able to maneuver the carb back into the boot with relative ease. Once this was done, I reattached the throttle cables and choke cable.

I also glued a new reel for the power cabe.onto the base of my old combination work light/extension cable I use in the shed and carport. Although the light is quite bright, these pictures were taken with the flash on so it looks less bright.

Next I put Scarlet’s battery on to charge.

I reviewed and updated the spare motor task list.

I also checked off an item on Scarlet’s task list for the first time since revising it!

Finally, I took another look at the rebuilt carburetor.

I’ll see if I can get the airbox back in and start her again this week!

The End Of My Holidays, Sylvie’s First Inspection Anniversary, And A Not-So-Smart Charger

This week I gave Sylvie some attention, as I’ll have finished my holidays by the time this post is published. It will also mark the first anniversary of my post about her successful rego inspection!

As expected, the battery had no charge after not riding for nearly a month!

This of course meant that the seat came off so I could access the onboard toolkit and take off the side panel to attach the charger.

I connected my newer “smart” charger.

It turned out that the charger wasn’t smart enough to recognise a flat motorcycle battery, as the fancy electronics seemed a bit confused by the apparently totally flat battery.

So I hooked up the trusty old trickle charger.

 

The lights indicated that it was charging, so I left it on for about 8 hours.

It seems to have had no problem charging the battery, as when I turned on the ignition again I found everything to be working as well as ever. I started the bike and let it warm up for a while.

Despite the temperature being 39-40°C (102-104°F, for any readers not yet using metric measurements), I put on my gear and went for a ride!

I’m happy to report that apart from needing fuel, no other issues came up.

That’s all for now – I’ll see what I can work on for next week’s update!

A New Charger, Scarlet Still Floods And Testing A Scratch Repair Kit On Erica’s Spare Tank

I picked a couple of new things from Aldi this week to keep me busy while I wait for a replacement chain and sprocket set for Sylvie.

While the faithful old trickle charger has served me well over the last few years, the fact that it’s switched to trickle mode hasn’t always been an accurate indicator of a battery that’s ready for use. With Scarlet’s battery on it over the last week, I decided to switch the charger over to Erica to help with the electrical troubleshooting.

Here’s a better view of the new charger.

Some assembly was required,

No tools were needed to put it together, so assembly only took about a minute.

The clamps seemed fairly sturdy and the colour-coded connector and nuts were a nice touch.

After following the instructions to make sure the new charger was in motorcycle mode and checking Scarlet’s battery, the new charger indicated that Scarlet’s battery was in fact charged.

In addition to the bright green LED, the outer box of the the battery symbol flashes to indicate a fully charged battery.

I decided to try the new charger on Erica, as the trickle charger was on slow charge mode. It shows 12.2 Volts but the electronics were clever enough in motorcycle mode to show that this battery still needed more charging.

The clamps were a little trickier to connect to a motorcycle battery still installed on a bike but held quite securely once positioned correctly.

After a few minutes, the voltage had increased slightly. I’ll see how this battery goes over the next week or so.

I turned on Scarlet’s ignition but no lights were working, so I started her up and found she started easily but stalled without choke and was dumping fuel fairly quickly. In order to confirm the source of the fuel, I moved Scarlet out onto some scrap cardboard on the lawn.

Sure enough, after running the motor for a few minutes a puddle started to form.

You can see exactly how fast it was coming out in the video below.

There was quite the puddle of fuel after only a short run.

After investigation, I confirmed the fuel was coming from the fuel hose at the bottom of the carburetor. Time for a rebuild or to swap out the one on Erica, it seems…

I also noticed the spring that connects the brake pedal to the brake light switch had come off, so I decided to fix that. The first thing I noticed was that the switch was sitting way too high up.

I lowered the switch as far as it would go, then reconnected the spring.

Then I adjusted the switch height and tested it by pushing down the brake pedal with my hand and checking the switch was pulled down as expected.

I took the opportunity to get a nice photo of Scarlet from the right before putting her away.

I moved the cardboard into the shed before putting Scarlet back, so I can hopefully catch any further spills before they hit the floor.

I decided to test the scratch removal kit on Ericas spare tank (the black one). I wasn’t expecting miracles from it, as it”s only really intended for minor scratch removal.

Here’s how the tank looked before using the scratch remover.

And here’s how it looked after.

To be honest, it just looks a bit more polished! I haven’t given up on it completely though, I’ll see how it goes on the minor scratches on Sylvie’s tank at some stage.

Next entry will be fitting Sylvie’s new chain and sprockets.

Providing there are no problems with Erica’s carburetor, I’ll probably do another  CB250RS carburetor swap and/or rebuild shortly after that before returning to electrical fault-finding.

 

I Helped A Stuck Rider (And Had Another Shed Cleanup).

This evening I had to make a stop for fuel right after work, as I’d hit the reserve level on the way to work.

After getting most of the way home, I saw a rider stopped on the side of the road. I pulled over and asked if he was ok. He thanked me for stopping, and let me know he’d run out of fuel and his reserve wasn’t working for some reason.

He lived not far from my home and asked if I could give him a lift near his house so he could organise to come back for his bike. I agreed, and was just reorganising my luggage to make room  for a pillion passenger when he let me know his reserve was working again and he’d got the bike started.

He asked if I’d mind riding behind him to the nearest petrol station to make sure he got there without further issues. I agreed, of course!

He waved me on just before the last set of lights before the petrol station and yelled out one more “Thank you!” as I passed and turned off towards my suburb.

No photo or video unfortunately, as I stopped using the GoPro on my daily commutes a couple of months ago!

Earlier this week, I’d realised the shed was getting cluttered again, so it was time for a cleanup!

I started with the stray spanners, hex keys and and gloves on Erica’s seat.

The stray cardboard was next.

The spanners should have been here.

I put Erica’s battery on to charge, so I can start her again later and have another look at the electrical system. I needed somewhere to put the air tools and old brake lever, too.

The remnants of flat-pack shelves were getting in the way too.

I left a fair bit of clutter behind after soda-blasting and even had trimmer line I’d left on the floor.

All a bit of a shambles, really…

Not to mention the random cardboard with recently-replaced parts somewhere under it!

There was a bit of a gap on the shelf that needed filling, so the cowl I’d used as test piece for blasting went back there.

The new air hose and tyre gauge fit nicely over the pole on these shelves.

A few spanners went back in the right places on the peg board.

A layer of soda dust was wiped off Erica’s seat.

Sylvie’s old headlight was rescued from the cardboard.

The CBF250 headlight was boxed and the air tools were stacked under the blackboard. The spare dented CB50RS tank will be sand or soda blasted another day, so I decided to get it off the floor while I was at it.

Tucked away neatly on the shelf again.

 

The older ones were cleared from under the trickle charger and Scarlet’s seat cleared of soda dust.

Sylvie’s old side panels and bar ends were retrieved from under the cardboard.

I bagged and tagged the bar ends.

The side panels and bar ends found a home under the workbench, near boxes containing similar parts.

The old brake lever went in the box with the headlight under the chalkboard.

The air tools were stacked more neatly and the warped veneer panels that once were the back of a shelf were put under the boxes to flatten them again.

Stray cardboard was removed and the floor was finally visible again!

The sand blaster spec sheet and troubleshooting guide were put somewhere they’ll be found again.

Almost lost under here was the mounting pin that broke off one of Sylvie’s side panels.

I made room for the blasting gun on the peg board.

The mounting pin was left near the side panels so as not to go astray again.

The tub of blasting sand found a home on a shelf.

And some random parts were left on the clipboard for visibility. THe top one is either a fairing mount left behind from Nix or a random mounting washer from one a CB250RS headlight bracket or instrument cluster.

The tags from the replacement side panels went on top of the old ones to remind me to re-tag them.

All in all, the she is slightly more organised than it was when I started!