Checking The Cracks On Khaleesi’s Casing

Just a short update this week, as my family and I have been sick with cold-like symptoms for a week and I’m still waiting on brake pads for Sylvie.

I decided to have a look at the crack in Khaleesi’s engine casing and see if could be fixed with J B Weld.

The good news was that the crack didn’t seem to extend into the engine casing, as it looked to be just on both sides of a bolt hole.

I cleaned up the bottom of the engine casing to get a better look and confirmed the cracks seem to be on either side of the bolt hole. Unfortunately this meant there was very little I could do to fix it with J B Weld but it doesn’t seem likely that it will need to be fixed to get the bike running again.

I was meaning to fill the cracks with J B Weld anyway but as her owner still had her rear wheel, Khaleesi was still on the bike lift and I didn’t have enough room!

That’s all this week – hopefully I’ll get the rear wheel back this coming week and finally get her back on the road.

If the brake pads for Sylvie arrive too, I’ll have a busy week!

Advertisements

Khaleesi’s Rear Wheel Comes Off For A New Tyre And Sprocket

This week, I took off Khaleesi’s rear wheel so her owner could get a thinner profile rear tyre fitted in order to leave some clearance for the chain.

The rear wheel was originally from a KR1S, so it had some spacers and washers added.

The first step was removing the split pin from the axle.

 

This was followed by the castle nut.

Then I removed the spacer and right chain tensioner.

 

Out came the axle and the wheel was off.

 

There’s some damage inside the brake caliper mount. The owner told me it was from when one of the screws holding on the rear brake disc wasn’t tightened enough.

The wheel itself seemed to be in good condition.

With the wheel off, I removed the sprocket mounting plate.

I left the sprocket mounting plate with the axle while I inspected the rest of the wheel.

There were some scrape marks on the brake disc mounting plate and the rubber shock damper for the sprocket mount had seen better days.

I compared the new sprocket with the old one to make sure the mount points were the same before opening the packet. the size difference is due to Khaleesi’s owner deciding to change the gearing for greater acceleration on take-off.

I put the sprocket mount in my bench vice to hold it while I undid the mounting screws

The old sprocket isn’t really worn, so it’ll be kept as a spare. There’s a considerable size difference between the sprockets due to the new sprocket having 40 teeth where the original one has 45.

 

I fitted the new sprocket to the mounting plate and  put it back on the wheel.

 

Khaleesi’s owner then picked up the wheel so he could get the tyre replaced. The spare tyre he already had was for a 17″ rim rather than an 18″ one, so it looks like it’ll be a little while before the rear wheel goes back on.

That’s all for this week – hopefully I’ll find some brake pads for Sylvie in my CBF250 spares box or I’ll need to order some for express delivery soon!

Progress On Khaleesi’s Front Sprocket At Last!

This week, I got Khaleesi’s old chain from her owner so I could temporarily fit it and hopefully get the front sprocket off.

I lined up the chain on the rear sprocket so I could temporarily fit a spare 520 master link.

I fitted a clip-style master link without the clip just to hold the chain in place but forgot to take photos of that step. After a lot of swearing while putting most of my weight on the rear brake while trying to use a breaker bar on the opposite side of the bike, I decided to  liberally apply WD40, set my large torque wrench to the specified torque setting and give it one last try. To my surprise, it worked!

With the nut finally loosened, I removed the chain again.

The nut was next, followed by the retaining washer and the sprocker itself.

I put the parts aside until I was ready to fit the new sprocket.

With the sprocket removed, I set about fitting the replacement external shifter cover.

I then replaced the clutch lever.

Comparing the old sprocket with the new one, there was a world of difference in terms of tooth wear. Also noticeable is the difference in size, as the new sprocket is one tooth smaller.

I fitted the new sprocket and finally added the small plate on the bottom left of it .

I still need to check under the engine and make sure the crack doesn’t appear likely to be causing any other issues before filling it with some J B Weld.

After that I’ll need to remove the rear wheel, fit the new sprocket to it (or the original wheel if the chain doesn’t have enough clearance form the tyre), put the new chain on torque the front sprocket nut completely.

I’l also connect a charger to the battery and top up the oil if I have any suitable oil before she goes back to her owner.

That’s all for this week, hopefully I’ll have most of this finished and can focus on my own bikes again after next week!

Wiring Up Sylvie For Trickle Charging And Picking Up A Plethora Of Parts

Because I’ve been using the heated grips a lot more now that the frosts have started and have a fairly short ride to and from work, I decided to fit some wiring to allow a trickle charger to be connected in order to prevent a flat battery recurring in the dead of winter.

The trickle charger had a connector on the charge cable where the clamps connect.

I found a jumper cable that uses the same style of connector at my local electronics store.

I bought a couple of crimp connectors while I was there

I cut the cable in half, as I might be able to use the other connector later.

I stripped the ends of the wires and crimped the connectors on.

I took Sylvie’s seat off and found one of the reasons I’ve had trouble getting the clips that hold the sides on in the right place when putting the seat back on.

I trimmed a little triangle out of the top layer of padding.

I took the left side panel off to get to the battery.

Once the side panel was off, I attached the new cable.

 

The side panel went back on and there was hardly a trace of the mod.

I connected the trickle charger and the expected lights came on before I plugged it in, indicating both that the polarity of the cables was right and that there was still some charge in the the battery.

I then switched the charger on and made sure the battery was charging. 

I also made a day  trip to Sydney to pick up some CB250RS parts and a spare swingarm for Sylvie that a friend from the 2fiftycc.com forums I’ve traded parts with before had brought with him while he was visiting Sydney for other reasons.

The swingarm came with the wheel mounts and chain adjuster plates

This rack was custom-made to fit the a CB250RS, so hopefully I’ll get one of them road-ready again over the winter and I can use it!

The parts included a full set of original indicators, a brand new inner tube still in the box, a mirror, several 50 master chain links and an assortment of brackets and clamps, including the original headlight mounting nuts, which will be very useful for restoring the original electrical connections on Erica’s headlight!

That’s all for this week. Hopefully I’ll have some new brake pads for Sylvie soon!

Sylvie Demands a Sleep-In, Her Bearings Arrive And I Suspect The Front Brake Pads

Just a short update this week, as I was celebrating my baby daughter’s first birthday over the weekend.

Last Monday Sylvie refused to start until I gave her a jumpstart from the car after not being ridden for a couple of days over the weekend. This wasn’t completely unexpected, as I’ve been using the heated grips a lot more now that the frosts have started and have a fairly short ride to and from work. I’m planning on fitting some wiring to allow a trickle charger to be connected in order to prevent this issue recurring in the dead of winter.

The replacement front wheel bearing kit for Sylvie arrived this week!

I was quite impressed with the kit.

While these looked like excellent aftermarket parts, I decided to take another look at the front wheel before fitting them as the noise seemed to be coming from the vicinity of the front brake caliper.

The pads seemed quite worn, so I decided to hold off on removing the front wheel until I have ordered some new brake pads and possibly a new brake disc. I’ll have to check the disc thickness just in case…

That’s all for this week. Next week I’ll most likely be making a weekend trip to Sydney to pick up some spare parts I’ve been offered for free if I can collect them!
Hopefully I’ll get some shed time in soon as well.

Khaleesi’s Sprocket Refuses To Budge And Sylvie Gets A New Footpeg

This week, I attempted to get Khaleesi’s front sprocket off with an old o-ring chain between the sprockets. I couldn’t fit the chain fully, as it was a little shorter than the length needed.

I had discussed my suspicion that the o-ring chain wasn’t likely to fit with Khaleesi’s owner and we’d decided against opening the sealed bag for the replacement chain in case it turned out the rear tyre was too wide. This turned out to be a wise choice, as there was absolutely no clearance between the old o-ring chain and the tyre.

I had no luck whatsoever with getting the front sprocket off, even with the old chain on the sprockets and the rear brake applied as hard as I could manage. As I don’t own an impact wrench and I’m not sure about the extent of the damage indicated by the cracked outer side of the bolt hole for the left side engine cover I discovered last week, I’ve advised her owner that he’s better off taking her to a qualified motorcycle mechanic.

Sylvie’s rear footpeg was looking a bit bare, so I had been looking forward to receiving the replacement parts for it.

The parts arrived, so I unpacked them ready to fit on the footpeg.

I didn’t realise when I ordered them that I’d  missed the plate at the end closest to the bike. The pillion pegs don’t get much use at the moment anyway, so I’ll order one with my next parts order for her.

With the new rubber cover fitted, the footpeg should at least stay in the folded position a little better!

That’s all I had time for this week. It’s my baby daughter’s first birthday next week, so I may not have free time for bike work. If that turns out to be the case, I’ll see if I can write a post about the work I did on my compressor recently that I’d intended to cover in a bonus post I forgot to write.

 

 

Swapping A Footpeg And Work On Khaleesi Continues

Since the replacement parts for Sylvie’s footpeg hadn’t arrived and I needed to keep riding Sylvie, I checked the pillion footpeg on the same side and found the parts were all the same. I decided to swap them over, so off they came!

I fitted the parts to the front footpeg and folded the rear one up and out of the way again. I’ll fit the new parts to the pillion peg when they arrive.

Khaleesi’s owner brought over the spare parts I’d been waiting for, so I unpacked the rag from the external shift mechanism and inspected the area where the replacement cover needs to go.

At first glance, everything looked ok.

I compared the old parts with their replacements.

On closer inspection, it looked like there was some minor damage to the engine casing I hadn’t previously noticed, but not enough for concern at this stage. I’ll make sure I let the owner know and re-check the bottom of the engine for evidence of oil leaks.

I started fitting the parts. I had put the new gasket in place before I realised that I needed to remove the front sprocket before the replacement cover place will go on.

This turned out to be somewhat more difficult than I’d expected as the engine turns over when I tried to unscrew the mounting nut, so I took a break for the evening and will consult the manual before giving it another go.

I will be fitting a new chain and sprockets on Khaleesi too – hopefully I’ll have an update on that next week!

If my replacement footpeg parts and bearing kit for Sylvie arrive next week, I may have a few busy weeks ahead…